Looking After our Older generation with Love…

“While I was distracted, Norah was busy standing up in the shopping cart, excitedly waving and gleefully proclaiming, ‘Hi old person! It’s my birfday today!’”

Seventy-eight years separate these two people in age. Somehow, their hearts and souls seem to recognize each other from long ago.
COMMUNITY.TODAY.COM

The loyalty of an animal..

Loyalty comes in all shapes and sizes. Our pets certainly become part of the family and we forget that they grieve too… #mansbestfriend#AFDA

A dog has been filmed lying beside the coffin of its owner, who was killed when a magnitude 6.2 earthquake struck central Italy.
WWW.9NEWS.COM.AU

The 5 stages of grief

In our work, On Grief and Grieving Elisabeth Kubler-Ross and I wanted to revisit the stages for clarification in grief and loss. The stages have evolved since their introduction and they have been very misunderstood over the past three decades. They were never meant to help tuck messy emotions into neat packages. They are responses to loss that many people have, but there is not a typical response to loss as there is no typical loss. Our grief is as individual as our lives.

The five stages, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with the one we lost. They are tools to help us frame and identify what we may be feeling. But they are not stops on some linear timeline in grief. Not everyone goes through all of them or in a prescribed order. Our hope is that with these stages comes the knowledge of grief ‘s terrain, making us better equipped to cope with life and loss. At times, people in grief will often report more stages. Just remember your grief is an unique as you are. – David Kessler

(Courtesy of grief.com)
To read more regarding each stage of grief visit the link below:
https://grief.com/the-five-stages-of-grief/

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The Last Post

Hear the Last Post – click this link. https://www.awm.gov.au/si…/default/files/media/last_post.mp3

In military tradition, the Last Post is the bugle call that signifies the end of the day’s activities. It is also sounded at military funerals to indicate that the soldier has gone to his final rest and at commemorative services such as Anzac Day and Remembrance Day.
The Last Post is one of a number of bugle calls in military tradition that mark the phases of the day. While Reveille signals the start of a soldier’s day, the Last Post signals its end.
The call is believed to have originally been part of a more elaborate routine, known in the British Army as “tattoo”, that began in the 17th century. In the evening, a duty officer had to do the rounds of his unit’s position, checking that the sentry posts were manned and rounding up the off-duty soldiers and packing them off to their beds or billets. The officer would be accompanied by one or more musicians. The “first post” was sounded when he started his rounds and, as the party went from post to post, a drum was played. The drum beats told off-duty soldiers it was time to rest; if the soldiers were in a town, the beats told them it was time to leave the pubs. (The word “tattoo” comes from the Dutch for “turn off the taps” of beer kegs; Americans call this “taps” or “drum taps”.) Another bugle call was sounded when the officer’s party completed its rounds, reaching the “last post” – this signalled that the night sentries were alert at their posts and gave one last warning to the other soldiers.
The Last Post was eventually incorporated into funeral and memorial services as a final farewell, and symbolises the duty of the dead is over and they can rest in peace.
Photo: The battalion bugler of the 27th playing the Last Post at sun-down (Frank Hurley).
Article courtesy of the Australian War Memorial.

 

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Coping with grief and loss

Losing someone or something you love or care deeply about is very painful. You may experience all kinds of difficult emotions and it may feel like the pain and sadness you’re experiencing will never let up. These are normal reactions to a significant loss. But while there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with the pain that, in time, can renew you and permit you to move on.
http://www.helpguide.org/…/g…/coping-with-grief-and-loss.htm

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