Fovant Badges

The history of the Fovant Badges is celebrated on the first Sunday of July every year. For 56 years volunteers have maintained the chalk badges embedded in the hillside along the A30. For more interesting and historical information go to……… http//www.fovantbadges.com

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The Fovant Badges Society is a voluntary organisation which has the objective of maintaining the regimental badges that were carved into the chalk downs above the village of Fovant by the soldiers of those regiments. The Society is determined that…
FOVANTBADGES.COM

Unique things that people will buy…

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/15/arts/design/mortality-lives-again-as-funeral-and-cemetery-items-pique-interest.html?smid=fb-share

Books and auctions are embracing artifacts relating to funerals and cemeteries.

The painful subjects of mourning and burying the dead are drawing attention at museums and auction houses, while some attractions in the field are reaching the ends of their runs.

In the last year the Museum of Death in Los Angeles opened a New Orleans branch, where coffins and autopsy equipment are displayed, and a show at the Palace of Versailles, “The King Is Dead” (through Feb. 21), commemorates the 300th anniversary of Louis XIV’s fatal bout of gangrene and examines his embalmment, elaborate funeral and interment. There have been shows and books about Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, the graves of early Maryland settlersthe evolution of gravestone and coffin makers’ tools, the significance of photographing corpses andmourning attire.

 

 

 

 

Funeral Procession of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

As Far as the Eye Can See – On April 9th, 1968, with the Atlanta skyline in the background, mourners lined the procession route of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. After the funeral, his body was carried humbly along Auburn Avenue, toward the downtown area, by way of a mule-drawn wagon. (Courtesy: HearseWorks)

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Funeral procession route lined with mourners along Auburn Avenue, Atlanta Georgia, April 9th 1968.

The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus

The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus was the tomb of the king, Mausolus (the word ‘mausoleum’ is derived from his name).

In 377 B.C., the city of Halicarnassus was the capitol of a small kingdom along the Mediterranean coast of Asia Minor (now known as Bodrum, Turkey). It was in that year the ruler of this land, Hecatomnus of Mylasa, died and left control of the kingdom to his son, Mausolus. Hecatomnus, a local satrap to the Persians, had been ambitious and had taken control of several of the neighboring cities and districts. Then Mausolus during his reign extended the territory even further so that it eventually included most of southwestern Asia Minor.

Mausolus, with his queen Artemisia, ruled over Halicarnassus and the surrounding territory for 24 years. Though he was descended from the local people, Mausolus spoke Greek and admired the Greek way of life and government. He founded many cities of Greek design along the coast and encouraged Greek democratic traditions.

Mausolus’s Death
Seven Quick Facts
Location: Halicarnassus (Modern Bodrum, Turkey)
Built: Around 350 B.C.
Function: Tomb for the City King, Mausolus
Destroyed: Damaged by earthquakes in 13th century A.D. . Final destruction by Crusaders in 1522 A.D.
Size: 140 feet (43m) high.
Made of: White Marble
Built in a mixture of Egyptian, Greek and Lycian styles
Then in 353 B.C. Mausolus died, leaving his queen Artemisia, who was also his sister, broken-hearted (It was the custom in Caria for rulers to marry their own sisters). As a tribute to him, she decided to build him the most splendid tomb in the known world. It became a structure so famous that Mausolus’s name is now associated with all stately tombs throughout the world through the word mausoleum. The building, rich with statuary and carvings in relief, was so beautiful and unique it became one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

 

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The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus

 

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Statue of King Mausolus

 

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Map of the Mausoleum location at present-day Bodrum, Turkey