On this day in 1970 – the computer mouse was invented.

Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013) was an American engineer and inventor, and an early computer and Internet pioneer. He is best known for his work on the challenges of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, resulting in the invention of the computer mouse and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces
In the early 1950s, he decided that instead of “having a steady job” (such as his position at NASA’s Ames Research Center) he would focus on making the world a better place, especially through the use of computers. Engelbart was therefore a committed, vocal proponent of the development and use of computers and computer networks to help cope with the world’s increasingly urgent and complex problems. Engelbart embedded a set of organizing principles in his lab, which he termed “”. He designed the strategy to accelerate the rate of innovation of his lab.
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Douglas+Engelbart
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Douglas Engelbart in 2008
Douglas Engelbart in 2008

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Waratahs Re-enactment March Poster

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Be part of this historic event on November 29th 2015 as the march moves through our region. See details below.

The South Coast Waraths left Nowra on Sunday 30th November 1915 and marched along the Princes Highway all the way to Sydney over 18 days.
The re-enactment is seeking to recreate where possible the route taken and hold a short service at each War Memorial along the way.

DETAILS
Start: November 29, 2015 9:00 am
End: December 13, 2015 2:00 pm
Cost: free
Event Category: South Coast
Event Tags: Commemoration, Education, History, March, Recruitment March, Remembrance

VENUE
Princes Hwy and surrounding roads & pathways South Coast, NSW Australia
Organizer: Clyde Poulton
Phone: 02 44212644
Email: sales@clydepoulton.com.au

http://veterans.nsw.gov.au/…/the-south-coast-waratahs-recr…/

http://clydepoulton.com.au/…/waratah-march-re-enactment-20…/

http://www.southcoastregister.com.au/…/green-light-for-war…/

 

Waratah relative relives proud history

By Robert Crawford May 30, 2014, 8am South Coast Register

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Nowra resident Norma Irwin’s father Reg Cashman who was a member of the 1915 Waratah march.

IT is believed Nowra resident Norma Irwin is the only living relative of one of the original Waratahs. On Tuesday, November 30, 1915, a group of 50 men left Nowra, marching for Sydney as part of a recruitment drive for World War I. Along the way, the group visited towns and villages, recruiting volunteers and by the time it reached Sydney had swelled to 117.

Mrs Irwin’s father, Reg Cashman, volunteered for service and took part in the march. The centenary of that march will be celebrated next year with a local committee hoping to stage a re-enactment. “I’ve been told I may be the only living relative of the original Waratahs left,” she said.
She still has a number of her father’s personal items including his diary, which has been transcribed in Alan Clark’s book, The Waratahs. In the diary, believed to be from as early as 1916, he listed his address as Berry Street, Nowra, his boot, collar and hat sizes, along with height and weight, accident insurance cover and his possessions, one watch and a bicycle, which he had left to his mother. His diary told of the voyage to Europe, with Private Cashman seeing action in France, describing conditions in the trenches.

Reg Cashman in his uniform.

Photo: Reg Cashman in his uniform.

“He used to ride a pushbike to the front line delivering messages and mail,” Mrs Irwin said. A head wound, suffered at Fromelles in April 1918, saw him shipped back to London to King George Hospital for treatment. “He was eventually shipped home,” she said. “The wound left him with part of his face dead.  It was like he couldn’t move his forehead. “He never had a creased brow.” The family still has the piece of shrapnel that caused the injury. Mrs Irwin also has a letter his mother wrote to him on the front, in which she described what was happening in Nowra, mentioning a few identities including Alex Braithwaite, who was the local funeral director and Les Gilbert, who asked to be remembered to him. There is also his soldier’s paybook, which revealed he was paid “14/4” per fortnight, and his bank book. Other prized possessions include his dog tags and medals. “They are pretty precious things and we are so lucky to have them,” she said. “Dad never spoke about the war, like a lot of the men who returned. “We didn’t know a lot about his war record. It wasn’t until after he died and we found his diary that we were able to piece together some of his service. “Like a lot of young men, he put his age up when he volunteered, he was only 17.” When he finally returned home, with a mate, he packed up his swag and travelled around the country, before eventually getting a job with Bacchus Marsh, delivering chocolate from Melbourne to Sydney. “Somehow he ended up back in Nowra met my mother, Ada Taylor, and the rest is history,” Mrs Irwin said.

Some of the items that bring Reg Cashman’s war service to life.

Some of the items that bring Reg Cashman’s war service to life.

“He eventually joined the PMG [Postmaster General Department] and we moved around with him. “The Waratah march is an important part of our history and I’m delighted the local area is going to commemorate the centenary. “I’m proud of what he did and it’s great they are going to be honoured. “It was a pretty amazing feat when you think about it, marching from Nowra to Sydney. “It took them something like three weeks and they stopped along the way with the various towns and villages feeding them on their journey. “Despite being a World War I man, he lived to the age 89.”

 

100 Years on from The Waratah March

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The marchers cross the Shoalhaven River. Picture: SHOALHAVEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY
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Waratah March through Nowra 1915. Picture: NOWRA MUSEUM

One hundred years ago volunteers marched from Nowra through the Illawarra to Sydney to gather recruits to fight in the Great War. Nowra historian Alan Clark has been researching what happened to the 120 or so men who joined the march.
“May the Waratahs grow in strength, flourish while temporarily transplanted in foreign soil, and return to us rich in achievements for King and country no less conspicuous and brilliant than their namesake, the crimson monarch of the Australian bush.”
These were the words of Mr E.H. Palmer, the organising secretary of the State Recruitment Committee as 50 volunteers began their walk from Nowra to Sydney in November 1915, known as the Waratah March.
Gathering military recruits along the way to fight in World War I, the March stopped at Berry, Kiama, Albion Park, Dapto, Wollongong and Wollongong’s northern suburbs before heading to Sutherland, Hurstville, Kogarah. (Courtesy of the Illawarra Mercury).
Photos: Shoalhaven Historical Society & Nowra Museum
http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/…/marching-into-history…/

 

Remembrance Day – 11.11.18 Why is this day special to Australians?

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At 11 am on 11 November 1918 the guns of the Western Front fell silent after more than four years continuous warfare. The allied armies had driven the German invaders back, having inflicted heavy defeats upon them over the preceding four months. In November the Germans called for an armistice (suspension of fighting) in order to secure a peace settlement. They accepted allied terms that amounted to unconditional surrender.

The 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month attained a special significance in the . The moment when hostilities ceased on the Western Front became universally associated with the remembrance of those who had died in the war. This first modern world conflict had brought about the mobilisation of over 70 million people and left between 9 and 13 million dead, perhaps as many as one-third of them with no known grave. The allied nations chose this day and time for the commemoration of their war dead.
https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/remembrance/tradition/

 

7 places where dying is not allowed

Death is usually considered the worst punishment possible for a crime. But what if the crime itself is death? In several cities around the world, municipal officials have forbidden residents to die, by threat of…well, basically nothing. No one has come up with a good punishment for the dead just yet.

France and Italy are particularly prone to declaring death unlawful, mostly because it’s has proven to be a successful way to protest untenable restrictions against cemetery expansions. Because when there’s no room to bury people, the only acceptable choice is to outlaw the Grim Reaper.

Here are seven towns that have urged their residents to become immortal—or at least not die within city limits:

1. SELLIA, ITALY
In August, the mayor of this town in southern Italy decreed that getting sick was not an option for residents. With only 537 residents, the majority of whom are over 65, dying might kill the town itself. So the ban, while unenforceable, is really meant to encourage people to stay healthy and take care of themselves. Anyone who doesn’t get a yearly checkup will be fined.

2. CUGNAUX, FRANCE
In 2007, Cugnaux had two cemeteries with only 17 plots left between them. Unfortunately, because of a high water table, the only land available to expand the town’s burial ground was on the nearby military air base. When the defense ministry decided against letting the town bury its dead there, Philippe Guérin, the mayor of the southern French village, decreed dying illegal for anyone who didn’t already have a crypt prepared to be buried in. His protest worked, and the defense ministry caved.

3. SARPOURENX, FRANCE
Inspired by Cugnaux’s example, in 2008, an overcrowded cemetery led the mayor of the 260-person hamlet in southwest France to forbid residents from passing on. “Offenders shall be severely punished,” the ordinance read. However, the 70-year-old mayor defied his own edictlater that year.

4. BIRITIBA MIRIM, BRAZIL
In 2005, faced with a shortage of space in the local cemetery, the mayor of this Brazilian town banned death. Cremation is frowned upon by the Catholic Church, and there were no more burial plots or crypts left. The farming community, which provides much of Sao Paulo’s fruits and veggies, could not expand its cemetery because of a 2003 law regulating areas with high water tables or special preservation designations. A new cemetery was opened in 2010, so presumably people are allowed to go on dying now. But for how long?

5. LANJARON, SPAIN
In 1999, the mayor of this town in southern Spain also faced a grave shortage. In response, he forbid his citizens to die until municipal officials could find space for a new cemetery. The decree ordered folks “to take utmost care of their health so they do not die until town hall takes the necessary steps to acquire land suitable for our deceased to rest in glory,” according to an AP story at the time.

6. FALCIANO DEL MASSICO, ITALY
In 2012, this 3700-person town outside Naples decided to outlaw death as a way to prod a neighboring town into letting it share cemetery space (the neighboring town had been charging non-residents more for a plot). Falciano del Massico did not have a cemetery of its own. Unfortunately, two senior citizens broke the law. As of 2014, the city was still fighting to get a new cemetery.

7. LONGYEARBYEN, NORWAY
This Arctic town, with a population of some 2000 people, is the world’s northernmost settlement, and is mostly a mining town. In 1950, realizing that bodies in the local cemetery were not decomposing, the town stopped allowing new burials. The bodies hidden under the permafrost are so intact that they have actually allowed scientists to study the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, because the virus was still preserved with its buried victims [PDF]. As Norway’s health benefits don’t extend that far into the Arctic, if you get sick, you have to go elsewhere. (Article originally appeared on Mental Floss).

This Arctic town, with a population of some 2000 people, is the world’s northernmost settlement, and is mostly a mining town. In 1950, realizing that bodies in the local cemetery were not decomposing, the town stopped allowing new burials. The bodies hidden under the permafrost are so intact that they have actually allowed scientists to study the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, because the virus was still preserved with its buried victims [PDF]. As Norway’s health benefits don’t extend that far into the Arctic, if you get sick, you have to go elsewhere. (Article originally appeared on Mental Floss).

http://connectingdirectors.com/…/47216-7-places-where-dying…

 

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