Telling the story. A 64yr old and a 7yr old ask each other about life. And their words are beautiful.

Posted on December 20, 2015 by CDFuneralNews

 

What happens when two people, 57 years apart, ask each other the same questions? What sort of advice could a 7-year-old have for a 64-year-old?
In a video by Facts., a young boy and an older man sit across from each other, against a bare white wall. Then, they proceed to ask each other the same questions about life and growing up.
An incredible conversation ensues:
“Do you wish you were young?” the boy asks the man.
“Well the great thing about being young is you have more time — you have more time to do things,” the 64-year-old responds. “I could play games, which I did. I used to play cowboys and Indians…I could use my imagination more.”
The 7-year-old finds this sad, to which the older man responds: “Well, I could be an older cowboy.”

Click on the link below to read more and to see the video.

http://connectingdirectors.com/…/47483-a-64-year-old-and-a-…

 man&boy

 

30 unconventional Christmas trees you haven’t seen before.

‘Tis the season to be jolly. Well, you know what season this is. Everywhere you go there are Christmas jingles and chimes in shopping malls, on the radio or online. That’s the sign that you should get started on two things: your Christmas shopping and how to start decorating your Christmas tree!

If you’re heading out to get a tree and brighten the spirit in your home but want to do something unique and outstanding this year, we’re here to help. We’ve compiled a list of very interesting, out of the ordinary, simply dashing Christmas trees from all over, to give you some ideas. Some are made of cans, sushi, CD shards, beer bottles, teddy bears and well, we don’t want to spoil the surprise (but do check out this list until the very last item)!

http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/unique-christmas-trees/

 

 

A quote from Albert Einstein

“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.”
― Albert Einstein

Born in Ulm, Germany March 14, 1879
Died: April 18, 1955
Genre: Science, Philosophy, Physics
Influences: Bertrand Russell, Sigmund Freud, Baruch Spinoza, Niels Bohr, Karl Pear and many more.
He completed his Ph.D. at the University of Zurich by 1909. His 1905 paper explaining the photoelectric effect, the basis of electronics, earned him the Nobel Prize in 1921. His first paper on Special Relativity Theory, also published in 1905, changed the world. After the rise of the Nazi party, Einstein made Princeton his permanent home, becoming a U.S. citizen in 1940. Einstein, a pacifist during World War I, stayed a firm proponent of social justice and responsibility. He chaired the Emergency Committee of Atomic Scientists, which organized to alert the public to the dangers of atomic warfare.

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The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus

The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus was the tomb of the king, Mausolus (the word ‘mausoleum’ is derived from his name).

In 377 B.C., the city of Halicarnassus was the capitol of a small kingdom along the Mediterranean coast of Asia Minor (now known as Bodrum, Turkey). It was in that year the ruler of this land, Hecatomnus of Mylasa, died and left control of the kingdom to his son, Mausolus. Hecatomnus, a local satrap to the Persians, had been ambitious and had taken control of several of the neighboring cities and districts. Then Mausolus during his reign extended the territory even further so that it eventually included most of southwestern Asia Minor.

Mausolus, with his queen Artemisia, ruled over Halicarnassus and the surrounding territory for 24 years. Though he was descended from the local people, Mausolus spoke Greek and admired the Greek way of life and government. He founded many cities of Greek design along the coast and encouraged Greek democratic traditions.

Mausolus’s Death
Seven Quick Facts
Location: Halicarnassus (Modern Bodrum, Turkey)
Built: Around 350 B.C.
Function: Tomb for the City King, Mausolus
Destroyed: Damaged by earthquakes in 13th century A.D. . Final destruction by Crusaders in 1522 A.D.
Size: 140 feet (43m) high.
Made of: White Marble
Built in a mixture of Egyptian, Greek and Lycian styles
Then in 353 B.C. Mausolus died, leaving his queen Artemisia, who was also his sister, broken-hearted (It was the custom in Caria for rulers to marry their own sisters). As a tribute to him, she decided to build him the most splendid tomb in the known world. It became a structure so famous that Mausolus’s name is now associated with all stately tombs throughout the world through the word mausoleum. The building, rich with statuary and carvings in relief, was so beautiful and unique it became one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

 

Mausoleum-of-Halicarnassus
The Mausoleum at the ancient city of Halicarnassus

 

Statue-of-Mausolus
Statue of King Mausolus

 

halicarnassus_map
Map of the Mausoleum location at present-day Bodrum, Turkey